Author Topic: Would you buy a robotic arm/computer that could play your variant?  (Read 65 times)

GothicChessInventor

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I have starting working on building my own Gothic Chess computer that will play with a robotic arm that moves the pieces. This won't be for sale to anyone, it's just a project I always wanted to do, and now that I am retired I have the time and energy to do it.

I am curious though. If you had the money, would you buy a computer (in the shape of your chess board) that could play your own variant and move the pieces?

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chilipepper

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If I had the money, yes.  But I would just have them play chess (to me the uniqueness is not the chess game, but the fact that it is being played by a robot).

In fact I would buy two, and have them play against each other (with time control like 40 moves per minute).

For inspiration, check this video of a robot that solves Rubik's cube in less than 3 seconds. I think there's others that do it in less than a second.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEiQwmEe45s&vl=en

Regardless, whatever you make it will be very cool. :)
« Last Edit: February 07, 2018, 06:46:24 pm by chilipepper »
the "chilipepper"👹

GothicChessInventor

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For inspiration, check this video of a robot that solves Rubik's cube in less than 3 seconds. I think there's others that do it in less than a second.

Yes, I am very "cube aware" and I wrote a 5x5x5 Rubik's Cube (the Professor's Cube) solver. It is the only "Brute Force" solver for the 5x5x5 and it can see 14 moves ahead. It is the only program on the planet that can solve this position:

https://alg.cubing.net/?puzzle=5x5x5&setup=F_3U_B_3U_B-_3U_B-_3U_B_3U_F_3R_F2_3R-&alg=3R_F2_3R-_F-_3U-_B-_3U-_B_3U-_B_3U-_B-_3U-_F-&title=14%20move%20offset%20centers

If you are interested in cubes, I oversee a Cube Discussion board mostly for larger Rubik's Cubes, 4x4x4 and up. One of the participants wrote a 17x17x17 solver!

http://cubesolvingprograms.freeforums.net/

chilipepper

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I can't believe the number of programs you've written to play chess variants, solve chess variant end-games, solve puzzles, and find prime numbers.

It's almost unbelievable. ::)

I very rarely use the word "God" to describe people. But I will say you are a puzzle and programming monster! :)
the "chilipepper"👹

GothicChessInventor

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I can't believe the number of programs you've written to play chess variants, solve chess variant end-games, solve puzzles, and find prime numbers.

It's almost unbelievable. ::)

I very rarely use the word "God" to describe people. But I will say you are a puzzle and programming monster! :)

It's one of the consequences of being old; you had a long time to do stuff.

I wrote my first chess program when I was 19. It ran on a machine with 128 Kilobytes of RAM. In other words, 1/8th of one megabyte. This was back in 1987.
I eventually upgraded my Macintosh 128K to a Macintosh SE/30 which ran at 16 MHz and had 2 MB of RAM. I thought that was fast.

I played it in USCF tournaments against other humans, and it was rated 2129. This was about 4 years after Ken Thompson's hardware machine, named Belle, broke 2200 for the first time.
The machine I have now has 1 million times as much RAM (128 GB vs. 128 MB) and is more than 1000 times as fast. I wonder what its rating would be if I could transport back in time and use this machine with my old program?

http://www.uschess.org/msa/MbrDtlMain.php?12528567

But I thank you for your kind compliments, although clearly God would be offended at the comparison. If I get smited by The Almighty, I blame you.

:)